Archive for the Kinky Killers Category

MANIAC (2012)

Posted in 2013, Art Movies, Based on Classic Films, Cult Movies, Disturbing Cinema, Exploitation Films, Grindhouse, Indie Horror, Intense Movies, Joe Spinell Films, Kinky Killers, LL Soares Reviews, Psycho killer, Remakes, Serial Killer flicks, Sleaze with tags , , , , , , , on July 16, 2013 by knifefighter

MANIAC (2012)
Movie Review by L.L. Soares

 Maniac

Yet another in a long list of  movies that do not need to remakes, William Lustig’s original MANIAC (1980) featured the amazing Joe Spinell (who also provided the story and co-wrote the screenplay) as Frank Zito, a violent psychotic who kills women and then scalps them, so he can attach their hair to mannequins that surround his bed like lovers. Visceral stuff, made all the more effective by the teaming of Lustig, Spinell, and effects maestro Tom Savini at the peak of his powers. This was one movie that lived up to its title, and yet there were tender moments as well, focusing mostly on the friendship (and blossoming romance?) between Spinell’s Zito and Caroline Munro’s photographer, Anna D’Antoni. It didn’t hurt that Munro was one of the most beautiful women to grace celluloid at the time. But Spinell somehow, through this relationship, made you sympathize with a man who is otherwise a deranged animal. You somehow cared about Zito and wanted to see him redeemed. Of course, in these kinds of movies, redemption eventually gives up and steps aside, so that punishment can take control of matters.

In the new version of MANIAC (2012), Franck Khalfoun gives us a strange recreation of the original film, with just enough quirks and differences to make it enjoyable on its own terms. Even if it comes nowhere near the gut punch of the original. This time, the script is co-written by Alexandre Aja, the director who has given us such recent horrors as the HILLS HAVE EYES remake (2006), MIRRORS (2008) and who is currently adaptating Joe Hill’s HORNS for the big screen. As for Khalfoun, he previously directed the murder in an underground parking garage flick, P2 (2007) and has acted in Aja films like HIGH TENSION (2003) and PIRANHA (2010).

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The new MANIAC stars Elijah Wood, oddly enough, perhaps the exact physical opposite of Joe Spinell. Where Spinell was genuinely creepy and yet always had a strange vulnerability to him, Wood seems slight and wimpy, but has a kind of strangeness to him that could easily be perceived as a capacity for violence. This aspect of Wood has been exploited previously in SIN CITY (2005), where he played an intense and merciless hit man with a penchant for eating human flesh. So this is hardly the first time someone saw Elijah Wood and thought “Hey, he might actually be an effective psycho.”

In MANIAC, however, Wood’s appearance and attributes are given only a small chance to shine, since the movie also adopts the rather odd gimmick of giving us the story from the killer’s point of view. What this means is that, throughout most of the film, we see everything through Frank Zito’s eyes. So whether or not Wood looks the part, we only see him occasionally, when he happens to look at himself in a mirror, for example.

Elijah Wood is actually quite good in the remake of MANIAC. I just wish he was onscreen more.

Elijah Wood is actually quite good in the remake of MANIAC. I just wish he was onscreen more.

This POV seems very artificial, making us very aware that this is not a gritty tour of the gutter like the original film, but something different. The new MANIAC strives toward art, towards being something more than just another killer on the loose flick. And yet, considering the subject matter, this arty direction doesn’t always work. We’re not watching a MANIAC film for artistic merit. We want to see a psychotic on the verge of complete madness, and the POV actually distances us from the meat of the film, even as it thinks that it is bringing us closer to the madman, by showing the film from his eyes.

The POV works some of the time. It’s not a bad thing, per se. There are some scenes that use this to nice effect. But in a movie like this, it doesn’t really elevate the story in any way. It’s just a fancy trick that tells us “No, you don’t have to really see Frank get his hands dirty.”

I actually like Elijah Wood. I’m not really a fan of projects like the LORD OF THE RINGS movies (or the HOBBIT films), but he’s been in plenty of other things that have impressed me. I think I first noticed him in Ang Lee’s THE ICE STORM (1997), and he has a kind of intensity that gives him a lot of range. I even enjoy him in the odd FX TV series WILFRED, where he plays a man whose best friend is a man in a dog suit (the rest of the world sees it as an actual dog). But the point is, Wood is kind of fearless and open to playing a wide variety of roles, however offbeat, and for what he does in MANIAC, I think he does a decent job. In a way, though, I would have preferred to see the whole “from the maniac’s eyes” viewpoint ditched, so that we could have really enjoyed Wood’s performance to the fullest.

In the new movie, Anna is played by Nora Amezeder as a French photographer who is drawn to Frank via his strange little shop where he carries on his family’s business of restoring antique mannequins. She uses mannequins in her photographs for artistic effect, and his equally artistic display of actual mannequins might just be the perfect complement to her photos in her upcoming gallery show. Can she borrow some of his work? He catches her taking pictures of his shop’s display window and invites her inside. The fact that she sees beauty in the same objects he does creates an immediate connection. And the groundwork is there for the one normal relationship in Frank Zito’s life.  Sadly, whatever normality there is between them won’t last for long. There’s no way it could.

Unfortunately, no matter how good Elijah Wood is as Frank Zito, he can never come close to Joe Spinell's performance in the original film.

Unfortunately, no matter how good Elijah Wood is as Frank Zito, he can never come close to Joe Spinell’s performance in the original film.

Wood’s Frank Zito has mother issues, after all, that go as deep as Norman Bates’s. We see flashbacks to Frank as a child, forced to watch as his mother has sex with all comers, whether its two sailors at once in her bedroom as he peers out from between the slats of a closet door, to a late night assignation in a parking garage, Frank wants his mother as much as he is repelled by her, and it is only a matter of time before relationships he has with other women dovetail into his feelings for his mother—even the one he has with poor Anna.

Feeling a possessive jealousy for whatever woman he comes across that he finds attractive, that same need to have them always turns into a stronger need to punish them. And therefore, he can’t really have any enjoyment with them while they are alive. He can only truly possess them (and come close to “loving” them) when they have been recreated, with their bloody scalps stapled onto the heads of his mannequins. In the darkness of his apartment, he convinces himself that the mannequins are the real women, and that they are now in an environment he can control. It is only then that he can show them that he cares.

So he drives around the city late at night, picking victims at random based on how they elicit lust in him, and making quick work of them. He tries to break the cycle, even joining an online dating service and meeting Lucie (Megan Duffy), a tattooed beauty who actually seems to act motherly towards him (uh oh!) when he complains of a migraine at the restaurant they agree to meet at, and who takes him back to her place afterwards for some almost-successful seduction. You really think Frank might finally loosen up and enjoy himself, but in the end, we know that’s impossible.

There are some interesting set pieces, including Frank hunting down Anna’s agent, Rita (Jan Broberg), breaking into her glorious Manhattan apartment to kill her in her bath tub. This sequence is done quite well

I liked this new version of MANIAC. It’s a good film, despite its flaws. It’s just easier to judge it as a stand-alone film about a psycho played by Elijah Wood. To compare it to Lustig’s original is to its detriment. There is no way this movie could deliver the goods like the original movie did.

I give it three knives.

© Copyright 2013 by L.L. Soares

LL Soares gives the 2012 version of  MANIAC ~three  knives.

 

(Despite being made in 2012, the new version of MANIAC is only now getting limited release in theaters in some cities. It is available on cable OnDemand in some markets as well.)

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Bill’s Bizarre Bijou looks into THE HYPNOTIC EYE (1960)

Posted in "So Bad They're Good" Movies, 1960s Horror, 2012, Bill's Bizarre Bijou, Hypnotic Horror, Kinky Killers, Mutilation, Paranormal, Sexy Stars with tags , , , , on December 6, 2012 by knifefighter

Bill’s Bizarre Bijou

William D. Carl

This week’s feature presentation:

THE HYPNOTIC EYE (1960)

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Welcome to Bill’s Bizarre Bijou, where you’ll discover the strangest films ever made.  If there are alien women with too much eye-shadow and miniskirts, if papier-mâché monsters are involved, if your local drive-in insisted this be the last show in their dusk till dawn extravaganza, or if it’s just plain unclassifiable – then I’ve seen it and probably loved it.   Now, I’m here to share these little gems with you, so you too can stare in disbelief at your television with your mouth dangling open.  Trust me, with these flicks, you won’t believe your eyes.

Oh, Allison Hayes, how I adore thee.  I sang your praises earlier this year in the gloriously campy voodoo-fest, THE DISEMBODIED (1957), and I am compelled to return to your side with 1960’s exploitation / trash classic THE HYPNOTIC EYE.  You are not the main attraction in this gruesome-for-its-time sickie, but your performance as Justine stands out among the others like a rose in a cesspool.

Actually, THE HYPNOTIC EYE is a fun little drive-in feature with a twisted plot that probably stunned audiences right out of their rumble seats.  Directed by television vet George Blair (who directed hundreds of episodes of such fare as THE GENE AUTRY SHOW, RACKET SQUAD, ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN, CASEY JONES, and WANTED: DEAD OR ALIVE), the film zips along swiftly with bursts of yucky violence and real live hypnotism demonstrations.  In fact, many of the actresses who performed in the film were actually mesmerized by an off-stage hypnotist and told what to do by the director using trigger words.  Thus, a feeling of real trances and surrealism suffuses the film, although I’m not certain the poor actresses couldn’t have performed just as well using actual acting skillsThe movie was even advertised as being filmed in Hypnomagic, a gimmick to get more seats filled in theaters, in which you – the audience—would actually be hypnotized while watching THE HYPNOTIC EYE.  It didn’t work on me, but perhaps the population was more susceptible back then.

The film starts on a shockingly sick note, when a black lingerie-wearing woman drying her hair over an open burner on a stove shoves her head down until her hair catches fire.  Instead of putting it out, she stands in her kitchen, screaming, unable to move while the hair on her head burns like Nic Cage in GHOST RIDER(2007).  This whole scene is witnessed through the burner, the flames dancing around the edges of the screen, the camera lurking within the stove.  Her entire head is wrapped in bandages and detective Dave Kennedy (played by Joe Partridge of many of George Blair’s TV shows) walks in and asks the doc, “Another self-inflicted mutilation?”  Under questioning, the woman admits she put her hair in the flame on purpose and then promptly dies.  Det. Kennedy expositions that eleven women have mutilated themselves with straight razors they thought were lipsticks or by sticking their heads into fans they thought were vibrators (what?).  So far, it’s all been unexplained.

This lady's got a hot new hairdo in the opening scene of THE HYPNOTIC EYE!

This lady’s got a hot new hairdo in the opening scene of THE HYPNOTIC EYE!

But life isn’t all mutilation and death for Kennedy.  That evening, he takes his girlfriend Marcia (played by Marcia Henderson of RIOT IN JUVENILE PRISON, 1959 and THE WAYWARD GIRL, 1957) on a date to see a popular hypnotist, Desmond (played by Jacques Bergerac of GIGI, 1958 and LES GIRLS, 1957; he was also the fourth husband of Ginger Rogers).  He makes a subject hot, then cold, then turns him into a very bad, mean dog!  There’s nothing like humiliating volunteers in front of a wildly applauding audience.  For his final demonstration, he gets three lovely women volunteers…and there is his assistant, Justine, played by the wonderful Allison Hayes in a hot sequenced outfit!  She helps him pick out the three prettiest women in the audience.  Dodie, a girl who came with the detective and his girlfriend, is one of the volunteers.  Dodie is played by the lovely Merry Anders (TICKLE ME, 1965, THE TIME TRAVELERS, 1964), and she is hypnotized by Desmond, and she actually levitates on stage under his French-accented instructions.  “Ladies and gentlemen…gravity defied!”  Det. Kennedy insists it’s all a trick of misdirection, although his girlfriend Marcia is thrilled.

The hypnotic Jacques Bergerac as Desmond.

The hypnotic Jacques Bergerac as Desmond.

Dodie doesn’t remember anything that happened onstage, and she rushes off after the show to the back entrance.  In a hypnotic state, she stares at a poster of Desmond then goes home where she fills a sink with boiling water and sulfuric acid and washes her face in it, melting away her skin and becoming the twelfth victim.  She survives, but is hospitalized and must be covered in paraffin, since her skin is burned away.  Det. Kennedy and Marcia visit her, and she admits that she remembered going home and washing her face but nothing else.  She knows she did it to herself, but she didn’t feel any pain at the time.

Det. Kennedy goes to a call and drops Marcia off at the theater where Desmond is performing, since she wants to see the show again.  Under Justine’s subtle direction, Desmond chooses, of course, Marcia.  She is the new subject for the levitation trick!  After the show, she tells Kennedy that Desmond is no fake, but that she faked being hypnotized and Desmond whispered in her ear that she wouldn’t remember anything except that she was to go back to his dressing room at midnight.  So, accompanied by Kennedy and his friend, a psychiatrist, she goes back to Desmond’s lair and plays along.

Once in his dressing room, she really is put under his spell by a blinking electronic eye thingie.  He tells her to get up and go to dinner with him.  He asks her address, and she tells him, while Allison Hayes lurks behind the corners, obviously bitter about the situation.  Desmond escorts Marcia to a nice restaurant, and her bodyguards sit at another table in case Desmond tries anything.  Then, they go to a way-crazy-man beat club for coffee and jazz.  So far, it’s a pretty great date.  Then, an old man in a beret screams “I have just written a poem.  Confessions Of A Movie Addict Or The Holy Barbarian Blues.  I was a teenaged movie monster.  I cut my teeth on Clara Bow…”  He goes on to recite the entire damn poem to bongo accompaniment.  He should’ve just called the poem “We Need Padding.  So Here Is Filler.”  Groovy, man, groovy.  Desmond dances with Marcia amongst the beat cats and chicks, which gets Kennedy all hot and bothered.  While dancing, Desmond whispers in Marcia’s ear, then he escorts her home and the detective waits outside while old Desmond makes out with his girl.  After a few minutes, the door opens, and Justine steps into the room.  She tells Desmond, “There isn’t much time.”  Justine makes Marcia go further down under.  Desmond asks, “How many more?”  Justine replies, “As long as there are faces like this.”  She then instructs Marcia to get ready for bed and she turns on the shower for her, making the water scalding hot.  What kind of plumbing does she have that the water is boiling hot in the shower?  Marcia strips while Justine orders her into the “cool, cool shower”.  At that moment, Dave Kennedy knocks on her door, interrupting the mutilation.

Allison Hayes as the mysterious Justine.

Allison Hayes as the mysterious Justine.

At the door, Justine informs Dave she’s a friend from school, visiting Marcia, but Marcia went to public school, and that just throws a monkey wrench into Justine’s plans.  But Marcia remains in a hypnotic state that can be triggered at any time.  It does make her act like a sex kitten, however.  Of course, big dumb lunkhead Dave still doesn’t get the connection between Desmond and the mutilated girls and Justine.  With cops like him, it’s a wonder any case ever gets solved in the city.  Justine, certainly a suspicious character, disappears out the fire escape.  Whoops!  Lost another suspect.

The psychiatrist friend is found in the morning playing classical piano in a smoking jacket with a white dog lying atop the piano!  He tries to explain the whole thing to dim-bulb Dave, but Dave is still in the dark.  They go to visit the first victim, the woman who stuck her face into an electric fan.  She says she has never been hypnotized.  Other victims confirm they were never hypnotized or saw the stage show.  However, it is soon discovered they are all lying (under post-hypnotic suggestion).  They have all been to see the show.

What is the strange relationship between Desmond and Justine?  Why is Justine causing the hypnotized ladies to mutilate themselves?  The answer is right out of a twist ending in a Scooby Doo cartoon.  It’s both ridiculous and horrifying at the same time, and it provides the lovely Ms. Hayes to really strut her stuff and chew the scenery.

THE HYPNOTIC EYE barrels along at a clipped pace for a brief 79 minutes, giving the viewer no time to discredit its hole-filled plot.  It’s hard to dislike the movie; it really pulls out all the stops to entertain.  It even contains a whole scene where Desmond looks right into the camera and hypnotizes the viewer in the movie audience!  There are beautiful women who are turned into monsters in various terrible ways through very good make-up effects created by Emile LaVigne, who created make-up for such great films as WEST SIDE STORY (1961), SOME LIKE IT HOT (1959) and THE DISEMBODIED (1957).  I wonder if Allison Hayes had him as her favorite make-up artist?    There are the dumbest cops of all time and damsels in distress.  The acting is good enough for this sort of thing, but the crisp photography by Archie Dalzell, who photographed LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS the same year, and also shot THE TRIP (1967), FIVE DESPERATE WOMEN (1971) and EBONY, IVORY, AND JADE (1979), makes it all pop.

Plus, where else will you hear the great line, “If you like my beautiful face so much, you can have it!”

I command you to see THE HYPNOTIC EYE!  I command you to get the restored copy from Warner Archive!  I command it!

I give THE HYPNOTIC EYE three burning heads out of four.

© Copyright 2012 by William D. Carl

Suburban Grindhouse Memories: HIDE AND GO SHRIEK! (1988)

Posted in 1980s Movies, 2012, 80s Horror, Grindhouse, Horror, Kinky Killers, Nick Cato Reviews, Slasher Movies, Suburban Grindhouse Memories with tags , , , , , on November 29, 2012 by knifefighter

Suburban Grindhouse Memories No. 58:
Generic, but FUN
By Nick Cato

The late 1980s were a semi-sad time for grindhouse aficionados. The VHS craze had left theaters a barren-wasteland for horror and exploitation film fans. But every once in a while something interesting was granted a theatrical release: 1988’s slickly-titled, late-to-the-game slasher outing HIDE AND GO SHREIK was one of them.

I took a solo-trip to the (now defunct) Fox Twin Theater around Thanksgiving of 1988, as most of my friends were either in college or passed out drunk somewhere by this stage of the game. Despite being opening night, the theater was relatively uncrowded. I noticed several other people my age (all guys) in attendance, and there was that certain “I hope this doesn’t suck” expectation on all their faces. Be it desperation or some act of otherworldly celluloid intervention, by the time the film had run a mere five minutes, the place was applauding and cheering on this low budget stalk-and-slash fest like we were at some kind of sporting event.

The “plot” here is simple: a bunch of high school graduates (who, of course, look 10 years older than high school graduates) decide to celebrate by having an overnight party at one of their father’s furniture stores (yes…you read that correctly). The humongous, multi-floored store features mostly beds, so I’m guessing this was one of the guy’s ideas. In fact, this place could easily have been called BED DEPOT. After some drinking and horsing around, someone suggests they play a game of hide and seek, and everyone agrees (I’m guessing alcohol clouded everyone’s judgment here). Naturally, there just happens to be someone else in the store who begins to kill those he finds. Most of the cast are typical big-haired 80s types, as well as your token nerd. (NOTE: we DO learn earlier that an ex-con is living in the building as one of the stock workers, so naturally he’s the prime suspect. You have to give the boss of this place a hand for helping out those trying to readjust to society. One scene of this guy cooking dinner had the audience laughing out loud…he really made those veggies his bitch!).

There are plenty of goofy sexual situations (none too graphic), so it’s safe to assume the director was as inspired as much by PORKY’S as he was FRIDAY THE 13th. One strip-tease seduction sequence is laughably bad, and one poor guy is insulted for not “lasting” long enough. There’s not much nudity but most of that can be blamed on the film’s poor lighting.

Then there are the kill scenes (which, after all, is the main reason to see a slasher film), but unfortunately about half of the teens survive the ordeal. Our killer does manage to off the few he catches in inventive ways (one is deep-sixed by a mannequin arm, and one poor girl loses her head via elevator in the most crowd-pleasing scene).

Like any classic low budget 80s slasher, HIDE AND GO SHREIK has its moments of confusion (the killer dresses in drag in one scene, then in S&M leather in the next) and the opening sequence of him raping and killing a hooker left everyone dumbfounded. I’m guessing they had to explain his craziness somehow? And despite its R-rating, the gore level is kind-of low and the language used by annoyed teens is laughable (perhaps the screenwriters had an aversion to profanity?). Either way, “teenagers” haven’t spoken this calmly since LEAVE IT TO BEAVER. There’s also an attempt at the killer blaming his actions on someone else, which leads to a showdown finale that has been done a zillion times before (it’s sort of like SLEEPAWAY CAMP (1983).Sort of. Kind of. Trust me on this one).

With all this one has going against it, it’s hard to pin-point why it manages to work. Perhaps it’s the setting; what horny teenage guys wouldn’t want to spend the night in a huge bed warehouse with a bunch of cute babes? Or maybe it’s some genuine suspense seldom seen in films of this type: a few stalk scenes build solid tension and lead to gut-cringing murders (one girl has her head smashed into a sink, filmed from the bottom of a see-through prop!). There are also several shots of mannequins staring at you that bring TOURIST TRAP (1979)to mind and further increase the film’s spooky atmosphere. Either way, HIDE AND GO SHREIK is one of the last of the truly fun 80s slasher films, complete with a very latent gay theme and a rare appearance by the beautiful Annette Sinclair (Google her).

While this was released on VHS, an official DVD release is still eagerly awaited by we legions of the obscure…but ah, the memories.

© Copyright 2012 by Nick Cato

What’s a slasher without issues? HIDE AND GO SHRIEK’s has plenty!

 

Transmissions to Earth: THE BLACK ROOM (1984)

Posted in 1980s Horror, 2011, 80s Horror, Drive-in Movies, Grindhouse, Horror, Indie Horror, Kinky Killers, LL Soares Reviews, Psychos, Trasmissions to Earth with tags , , , , , , , on June 16, 2011 by knifefighter

Transmissions to Earth: THE BLACK ROOM (1984)
Movie Review by L.L. Soares

Another horror flick from the early 1980s. However, this is a kinky one.

A couple find they’re love life isn’t what it used to be (thanks mostly to two bratty kids who keep interrupting them), so husband Larry (Jimmy Stathis) decides to find some fun elsewhere. He finds an ad in the paper for a room to rent for only $200 a month at a “hilltop mansion” and checks it out. We’re not talking an apartment here. This room is clearly for one purpose only. It’s dark, with candles everywhere and glowing, white, geometrical tables. And lots of pillow all over the floor. Larry is immediately impressed and pays for a month’s rent in advance.

He then starts bringing lovers back there. Like college student Lisa (Charlie Young), and a hooker he pays for two hours’ time. Later on, at home, Larry tells his wife Robin (Clara Perryman) all about the room and his sexual escapades, telling her it’s all fantasy. She buys it, and these stories he starts telling her seem to be perking up their love life too. So everyone’s happy for a while.

The room, however, has two very strange landlords, handsome Jason (Stephen Knight) and his exotic-looking sister, Bridget (Cassandra Gava), who take a lot of interest in their new tenant’s activities. There’s a two-way mirror so they can watch Larry have sex with the girls he brings back with him, and Jason even takes tons of photographs (this is before the days when home video cameras were commonplace – besides, Jason is an “artiste”). But that’s not all. Not only do they spy and take pictures, they also occasionally take one of Larry’s girls’ for their own purposes, when circumstances allow them to do so without getting caught. And just what do they do with these girls? Well, it turns out Jason is pretty sick. He has some kind of blood disease where he needs transfusions often. It used to be once a month, but now he needs new blood twice a week. So they’ve got a machine set up in a downstairs room and use their abducted victims to provide poor Jason with fresh blood supplies. Of course, Larry knows nothing about this extracurricular activity.

Larry seems to be comfortable around his creepy landlords. At one point, when college girl Lisa can’t make it to a rendezvous, Bridget even offers to fill in herself and has a wild afternoon with Larry where they both get done up in body paint and play “Matador and Bull” in the black room (while Jason watches and takes picture of course).

So everything goes smoothly until Robin realizes that Larry’s “black room stories” are real. She finds the newspaper ad for the room and the keys in Larry’s car, and has an irresistible urge to check it out. When Jason finds her in the room, he tells her everything and even offers to let her watch Larry in action. When she is confronted with reality—she watches as Larry brings Lisa and her boyfriend Terry (Christopher McDonald) to the room; Terry says he just wants to watch and take notes for a psychology paper, but who knows what those three are up to in that darkened room—it hits her like a ton of bricks. This isn’t just a story, Larry is really cheating on her! At first she is completely devastated, until a seemingly sympathetic Jason talks her into considering another course of action. If Larry can have sex with strangers here, so can she, and that would mean twice as many victims to provide Jason with fresh blood!

Things get even more bizarre after that, as both Larry and Robin become aware of what’s going on, and have to look at their marriage in a completely different light. Meanwhile, Jason seems to need more and more blood, and Bridget does her best to keep the transfusion machine going.

There’s even an early role for future scream queen Linnea Quigley in this one, as Milly the babysitter.

Co-directed with lots of atmosphere by Elly Kenner and Norman Thaddeus Vane (Vane also wrote the screenplay), THE BLACK ROOM has good performances and a suitable sleazy tone. As you delve deeper into these characters’ lives, they become more and more fascinating. From Bridget getting attached to Larry (it looks like she and Jason never leave the house and see the outside world) to Robin’s disillusionment (the character changes before our very eyes in response to what she sees), this movie is a completely different animal from the usual 1980s horror movies that featured killers with knives and unlucky teenagers. THE BLACK ROOM is that rare horror film that actually deals with adults and adult matters. And for that reason, I recommend you check it out.

-END-

© Copyright 2011 by L.L. Soares