Archive for horror

GHOUL (2012)

Posted in 2013, Cable movies, Family Secrets, Grave Robbing, Horror, Monsters, Paul McMahon Columns, Supernatural, The Distracted Critic, TV-Movies with tags , , , , , , , on April 3, 2013 by knifefighter

GHOUL (2012)
Review by Paul McMahon, The Distracted Critic

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GHOUL is a movie I’d been following since I heard it was in production. Brian Keene’s novel remains my favorite work of his, and one of the more effective horror novels I’ve read. The reason Keene’s novel works is because the main horrors do not come from the creature haunting the graveyard, but from the parents who have the responsibility of raising their children in a safe and secure environment. This means, however, that a lot of the novel’s effectiveness comes from internal dialogues and the inner thoughts of the characters, both of which are very difficult to show on screen. As thrilled as I was that someone was finally filming a Brian Keene story, I thought that they couldn’t have picked a tougher story to adapt. Because of this, I went into the movie with high hopes but low expectations.

We start with Timmy (Nolan Gould, from the TV show MODERN FAMILY) digging his comics out from under his bed. As soon as he gets comfortable, his mom calls lights out. It demonstrates that kids are at the mercy of their parents’ rules and whims, setting the tone for the film. The next morning, Timmy watches cartoons while his Dad demands his attention. “The start of summer vacation doesn’t save you from your chores!” Timmy’s grandpa shushes him, pretending that he’s watching TV as well. Frustrated, Dad leaves the room. Grandpa (Barry Corbin, NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN, 2007) calls Timmy over and asks what he and his friends are planning to do with the underground clubhouse they’re building near the cemetery. Timmy is shocked because they thought nobody knew about it. Grandpa assures him nobody else does.

Later on, Timmy and Grandpa are working in the garden and Timmy’s friend Doug (Jacob Bila) bikes up out of breath, having been chased by a stray dog. Grandpa offers to finish Timmy’s chores and sends him on his way. Doug and Timmy go to Barry’s house, where Barry’s Dad (Dane Rhodes, DJANGO UNCHCAINED, 2012) bullies them, calling Doug a fag and telling him that’s probably why his Dad left. Timmy responds by accusing him of making Barry do his job while he sleeps off last night’s bottle. Barry’s dad forbids them to play near the cemetery again.

Dane Rhodes, as Mr. Smeltzer, terrorizes Timmy and Doug in Brian Keene's GHOUL.

Dane Rhodes, as Mr. Smeltzer, terrorizes Timmy and Doug in Brian Keene’s GHOUL.

Timmy and Doug meet up with Barry (Trevor Harker) and together they head to their clubhouse. They look at Doug’s hand-drawn map of the surrounding area. Suddenly, they hear Timmy’s Mom calling him. She’s frantic, distraught. “It’s your Grandpa, honey, I’m sorry.”

There are a lot of other things going on, and we get quick scenes depicting some of it. Three older kids on bikes, obviously up to no good, are searching the woods for the clubhouse. A pair of lovers making out in the woods are attacked and presumably killed.

After Grandpa’s funeral, Timmy and his friends are in the cemetery when Doug falls waist-deep into a sinkhole. Barry and Timmy pull him out. Barry says the sinkholes are all over the place because of the old mining operations. While Barry goes for the first aid kit, the stray dog appears, charging and barking. Barry grabs a shovel and attacks the dog viciously, cussing it out while he wails on it. The ferocity of his actions shocks Timmy and Doug. Later on, as they help Barry put away the tools, they discover another sinkhole in the caretaker’s shed, covered by a jagged piece of plywood. That night, over dinner, Timmy asks his dad about the stories of the ghoul. His dad tells him the ghoul is the equivalent of Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster.

Steve, one of the three bullies from earlier, spied Timmy and his friends in the shed. That night, Ronnie and Sammie join him and they break into the shed, planning to vandalize what they think is the kids’ clubhouse. They wonder how Timmy and his friends could have shoveled out the maze of tunnels they find, and then Ronnie and Steve continue on, leaving Sammie to stand watch. Predictably, Ronnie and Steve are attacked. Sammie runs back the way they came, arriving at the hole to see Barry’s Dad staring down at her. She pleads with him for help. “You shouldn’t play where you’re not invited,” he says, then pulls the plywood over the hole while she screams.

It’s difficult to distance yourself from a novel as good as GHOUL in order to take a movie adaptation on its own terms. Part of what makes the book so memorable is that it reaches beyond the usual coming-of-age story. These kids are dealing with some heavy-duty subject matter. Doug confesses that his mother comes to him at night and does things to him. Barry’s Dad regularly and brutally beats on him and his mom. From an acting standpoint, staying true to these emotional wallops would tax even the most practiced actors. The three kids in these roles do all they can, and in some scenes they fare pretty well, but in many others they seem disconnected from what’s going on. It felt like they saved their energy for the “big scenes,” which left many of the slower scenes flat.

Nolan Gould, Jacob Bila and Trevor Harker give their all while tasked with monumental acting challenges.

Nolan Gould, Jacob Bila and Trevor Harker give their all while tasked with monumental acting challenges.

The biggest problem I had with the movie is that it didn’t flow as a whole. It felt bumpy, as if I was watching something that had been heavily edited to fit time constraints. You learn to expect that from a made-for-TV movie, but with this one every time I started to get a handle on what was happening, the scene jumped away, plunging me into something else with no transition time.

Changes have been made to the story as well. Timmy’s parents are not what they were on the page. His mother is more prominent and caring, while his dad is in only two scenes and comes off as simply crabby and overworked. The most traumatic scene of the book has been cut entirely from the movie. If you read the book, you know what scene I’m talking about. There was also a major change to the ending, which I understand kept the focus on the humanity of the story, but it’s not a change any fan of the book will embrace.

GHOUL was a bold choice to put before the cameras, but, sadly, I can’t recommend the finished product. Fingers crossed that the upcoming DARK HOLLOW is a stronger film and more worthy of Keene’s name.

I give GHOUL 1 and one half stars, with 2 timeouts.

© Copyright 2013 by Paul McMahon

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Quick Cuts: Fun With the Oscars

Posted in 2013, Best Of Lists, Oscar-Worthy, Quick Cuts, Special Columns with tags , , , , , , , , on February 23, 2013 by knifefighter

QUICK CUTS:  Fun with the Oscars
With Michael Arruda & L.L. Soares

MICHAEL ARRUDA:  It’s Academy Awards time.  I thought we’d have some fun and do our own Cinema Knife Fight version of the Oscars, picking from familiar Academy Award categories, but staying within specific genres.

Here’s my take on the Best of 2012 Horror movies and the Best of 2012 Action movies:

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Best of HORROR movies 2012:

-Best Supporting Actress- Alice Eve, THE RAVEN

-Best Supporting Actor- Richard Jenkins, CABIN IN THE WOODS

-Best Actor- Ethan Hawke, SINISTER

-Best Actress –Kathryn Newton, PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4

-Best Screenplay- Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard, CABIN IN THE WOODS

-Best Director- Timur Bekmambetov, ABRAHAM LINCOLN:  VAMPIRE HUNTER

-Best Picture – CABIN IN THE WOODS

 *****

TheAvengers.jpg

Best of ACTION movies 2012:

-Best Supporting Actress-Kate Beckinsale, CONTRABAND

-Best Supporting Actor- Leonardo DiCaprio, DJANGO UNCHAINED

-Best Actor – Tom Cruise, JACK REACHER

-Best Actress- Scarlett Johansson, THE AVENGERS

-Best Screenplay- Joss Whedon, THE AVENGERS

-Best Director- Quentin Tarantino, DJANGO UNCHAINED

-Best Picture- THE AVENGERS

*****

L.L. SOARES: And I’ve decided to do three list, for Horror, Action/Drama and Science Fiction.

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Best of HORROR movies 2012:

-Best Supporting Actress- Hannah Fierman, V/H/S (segment “Amateur Night”)

-Best Supporting Actor- Fran Kranz, CABIN IN THE WOODS

-Best Actor- Neil Maskell, KILL LIST/Ethan Hawke, SINISTER (tie)

-Best Actress –Sarah Bolger, THE MOTH DIARIES

-Best Screenplay- Amy Jump and Bean Wheatley, KILL LIST

-Best Director- Ben Wheatley, KILL LIST

-Best Picture –KILL LIST

 ****

Django-unchained-131112

Best of ACTION movies 2012:

Is  DJANGO UNCHAINED really an action movie? If so:

-Best Supporting Actress-Salma Hayek, SAVAGES

-Best Supporting Actor- Leonardo DiCaprio/Samuel L. Jackson (tie) DJANGO UNCHAINED

-Best Actor – Christoph Waltz/Jamie Foxx (tie) DJANGO UNCHAINED

-Best Actress- Anne Hathaway, THE DARK KNIGHT RISES

-Best Screenplay- Quentin Tarantino, DJANGO UNCHAINED

-Best Director- Quentin Tarantino, DJANGO UNCHAINED

-Best Picture- DJANGO UNCHAINED

-Best Fight Choreography – THE RAID

*****

John Carter

Best of SCIENCE FICTION movies of 2012:

-Best Supporting Actress- Emily Blunt, LOOPER/ Charlize Theron, PROMETHEUS (tie)

-Best Supporting Actor- Pierce Gagnon, LOOPER

-Best Actor – Taylor Kitsch, JOHN CARTER

-Best Actress-Noomi Rapace, PROMETHEUS

-Best Screenplay- Andrew Stanton, Mark Andrews and Michael Chabon, JOHN CARTER /Rian Johnson, LOOPER (tie)

-Best Director- Andrew Stanton, JOHN CARTER

-Best Picture- JOHN CARTER

*****

ARRUDA:    Have fun this weekend watching the real thing!  Thanks for joining us!

—END—

HORROR-MOM TAKES A SNOW DAY!

Posted in 1990s Horror, 2013, Ancient Civilizations, Family Secrets, Horror-Mom's Guide to Scary Movies, Sheri White Reviews, Stephen King Movies, TV-Movies with tags , , , , on January 20, 2013 by knifefighter

HORROR-MOM’S GUIDE TO SCARY MOVIES
Horror-Mom Takes a Snow Day!
By Sheri White

Another snowy day, another school day canceled. You’ve seen enough of Spongebob and iCarly, and you’re tired of the yelling and the cries of “I’m bored!” And that’s just you! Imagine how the kids feel by now. Christmas is over, the toys are broken and it’s too cold to go out.  YOU’RE ALL TRAPPED.

What do you do? Movie marathon, of course! And I have the perfect movie to watch together in a huddle under some blankets while the snow piles up outside – STEPHEN KING’S STORM OF THE CENTURY. This is an original TV mini-series penned by Stephen King, shown over several nights in 1999. It’s dark, claustrophobic, and very creepy.

StormofCentury_Cover

Little Tall Island, a little village off the coast of Maine, is getting ready for a blizzard to hit, the worst they’ve seen in decades. Most of the citizens have evacuated, with just a handful staying behind to ride it out. But when Mike Anderson, the town constable, is called to a brutal murder, the townspeople begin to realize they are threatened by more than a storm.

Mike takes the murderer, Andre Linoge, into custody; he doesn’t put up any resistance but lets Mike know that he’ll go away if he’s given what he wants. Dismissing this ominous intonation at first, the townspeople go about getting ready for the storm. As mysterious things begin happening around them, they finally realize that Linoge is more than just a murderer—he’s something dark and evil, and they are all in danger.

Terrified, they eventually agree to give Linoge what they want—but the price they have to pay will be immeasurable.

STORM OF THE CENTURY is not for young children. But if your kids are middle-school-aged and older, you will enjoy a cozy afternoon of terror while snow rages outside your own window.

© Copyright 2013 by Sheri White

Horror-Mom’s Guide to Scary Movies Presents: THE GREEN MARKER SCARE (2012)

Posted in 2012, Animated Films, Horror, Horror-Mom's Guide to Scary Movies, Mystery, Sheri White Reviews, Teen Detectives, Twist Endings with tags , , , , , on December 5, 2012 by knifefighter

HORROR-MOM’S GUIDE TO SCARY MOVIES PRESENTS:
THE GREEN MARKER SCARE (2012)
Film Review by Sheri White

 

When Graham Jones asked me to review his new online movie, he told me it was animated by children. So I thought it would be perfect for this column. Graham did tell me that although it was animated by kids, it was definitely not a movie for kids.

I was skeptical, because when I hear that, and then watch the movie, it’s usually pretty tame. And I thought that about THE GREEN MARKER SCARE for the first 45 minutes or so. Sure, it was a little creepy here and there, but nothing most kids couldn’t handle.

Noreen is a young girl whose father is killed in a car accident. His last words inspire her to investigate the crash, since it doesn’t really seem accidental. Her findings lead her to realize there is something evil going on in her small town, and her father knew all about it.

The entire movie is drawn in green marker. There isn’t a lot of movement in the characters, which is a little creepy in itself—most of the time, only the eyes move.

There is no sex at all in the movie, and no overt violence. The only violence is off-camera, but it’s still shocking.

So is this movie appropriate for children? That’s actually a difficult question to answer in regards to this movie, unlike if I were reviewing (something obvious like) THE EXORCIST (1973). The subject matter in THE GREEN MARKER SCARE is definitely not for little kids, but then again, little kids won’t really get what’s going on. This is not in-your-face horror, and most young children will be bored since a lot of the movie is dialogue.

Older kids probably won’t be phased by the subject matter, unless they scare easily or are brought up in a very religious household.

I think this is more of a movie for adults, not just because of its subject matter, but because it is so quiet and dialogue-driven. Most kids who watch horror movies like the loudness, the gore and splatter. But adults, and especially parents, will appreciate how the movie comes together to horrify the watcher.

This is an Irish movie and the characters have Irish brogues—it was a little difficult to understand some of the dialogue at times, but the movie was so well put together, that I was still able to follow the story.

Variety magazine calls Graham Jones  “a very talented director,” and after watching THE GREEN MARKER SCARE, I would have to agree.

I give it four knives.

To view the movie for yourself, go HERE.

NOTE: Although children drew this movie, they were unaware of the subject matter.

© Copyright 2012 by Sheri White

Sheri White  gives THE GREEN MARKER SCARE ~four (out of five) knives!

THE BAY (2012)

Posted in 2012, Conspiracy Theories, Disease!, Faux Documentaries, Found Footage Movies, Gore!, Horror, LL Soares Reviews, Parasites! with tags , , , , , , on November 15, 2012 by knifefighter

THE BAY (2012)
Movie Review by L.L. Soares

This one sounded interesting to me. A “found footage” horror movie by Barry Levinson, the director who gave us such memorable films through the years as DINER (1982), THE NATURAL (1984), RAIN MAN (1988), BUGSY (1991), SLEEPERS (1996) , WAG THE DOG (1997) and lots more. That’s one hell of a resume.

And I’ve actually enjoyed most of the “found footage” movies that have been coming out lately, even though the genre gets a bad rap. I was definitely interested in seeing what Levinson would do with the concept.

THE BAY (2012) got a limited release in a few cities across the country, and is also currently on cable OnDemand. Watching this movie, I found myself wondering why it didn’t get a wider release.

The “bay” in question here is Chesapeake Bay, which I read is “the largest estuary in the United States” surrounded by Maryland and Virginia. The movie THE BAY takes place mostly in a small town called Claridge, Maryland. It relies mostly on tourism for its income. But there are also lots of chicken farms in the area, made possible thanks to a big desalination plant that makes enough water available to support the industry. But there’s the problem of animal waste and rumors that there might have been a nuclear waste leak years back, or so the movie tells us. And that chicken waste has a lot of chemicals in it like steroids and other stuff to increase the birds’ growth and meat production.

It’s the Fourth of July, and there’s a big celebration in Claridge, including a crab-eating contest and sailing and fireworks. But this year, something goes wrong. People start getting sick. They starts to erupt with boils and throw up blood, and develop wounds that look as if their flesh is being eaten away from the inside. People start to panic, and bodies start piling up in the streets.

What is causing this pandemic? We have clues as to the conditions that bred such a disease, but the actual culprit might surprise you.

Meanwhile, the movie is made up of footage that was being suppressed. A chunk of it is from the point of view of Donna Thompson (Kether Donohue), a young news reporter who got her “big break” that Fourth of July, when she thought she was just covering another small town holiday, but instead stumbled on something horrible. She just wants to get this footage out to the world before it happens again.

Not all of the footage is of Donna and what she witnesses, however. There’s also video of two researchers who were testing the bay’s toxicity;  a family (wife, husband and baby) who film themselves taking their boat to Claridge to meet the wife’s parents; and footage of Dr. Jack Abrams (Stephen Kunken), who first sees an emergency room waiting area with about 30 people who are infected with strange symptoms. Then he sees that number rise to 60 people, and more and more. His frantic Skypes to the Center for Disease Control don’t seem to be taken seriously at first, and by the time the authorities start to worry, it’s clear they want to cover this up and avoid a mass panic. We also see a few Claridge police officers making their rounds in COPS-like footage, and we see a girl on Facebook making videos, unable to get help, and afraid she might die alone. As the movie progresses, the symptoms of the people infected get more gory and disturbing.

Somehow, all this various footage meshes well together, and tells a compelling story about a horrible flesh-eating disease, and puts a human face on that disease.

Levinson does a fine job with the material. No matter how much I want to get sick of the found footage genre, movies like this pop up that keep it viable. I was pretty riveted throughout, wondering what was behind all this, and if it could be stopped in time. Levinson does a great job here building suspense. And the performances help him to sell the story. The acting here is all very good and the people are believable.

Keather Donohue plays reporter Donna Thompson, who is trying to get word out about what seems to be a killer disease in THE BAY.

There has been some hype about the fact that Oren Peli is one of the producers. He’s the guy who gave us the PARANORMAL ACTIVITY franchise and the short-lived ABC series THE RIVER. And sure, Peli is the king of this kind of stuff. But THE BAY stands or falls on the work of a director named Barry Levinson, and while it might seem that he’s working with material that is beneath him, he pulls it off really well.

I enjoyed this movie, and it kept me glued to the screen throughout. I give it three knives.

© Copyright 2012 by L.L. Soares

LL Soares gives THE BAY ~three  knives.

Screams Cut Short: PRANK (2012)

Posted in 2012, Gregory G. Kurczynski Columns, Practical Jokes Gone Wrong, Revenge!, Screams Cut Short, Short Films with tags , , , , , on November 7, 2012 by knifefighter

SCREAMS CUT SHORT Presents:
PRANK (2012)
Written and Directed by Robert Mearns
Review by Gregory G. Kurczynski

It is often said that every story may not have been written, but every story has already been told. This is especially true of horror, with so many of the basic themes and archetypes being revisited by writers and filmmakers almost daily. The responsibility then becomes not to create something necessarily original, but to shift perspective and examine the themes to tell the same story in a way that gives it an individual voice.

It is with these thoughts in mind we take a look at PRANK, a seven minute tale of bad judgment and its resulting consequences, which either works or fails depending on the context in which it is viewed. But I’ll expand on that later.

The movie opens on a scene reminiscent of any installment of the SAW or HOSTEL franchises. In an isolated section of some industrial facility, Jimmy (Ben Elliott) lies stripped, bound and gagged on the grimy metal floor. He screams and struggles as a winch begins to pull him upward by his feet, suspending him upside down, as we are treated to scenes of a barely glimpsed figure in an adjoining room preparing to do very bad things to Jimmy. We’re not sure what, but it’s clear that they involve an industrial paint sprayer.

From this, we cut to a scene of Beth (Kara Miller) waking with a start as if from a nightmare, but it’s only the phone ringing. It’s a friend of Beth’s calling to tell her that she had a visit from the police. Apparently Jimmy has disappeared, and the cops were asking about Brandon.

What happened to Brandon? Cut to a flashback of a deserted, moonlit beach where Jimmy is burying an unconscious Brandon (Mike Armstrong Jr.) up to his neck in the sand ala Ted Danson in CREEPSHOW (1982). Beth, who is clearly Jimmy’s girlfriend, protests, but Jimmy will not be deterred. It’s all harmless fun, a prank at Brandon’s expense that will result in a simply hilarious YouTube video. Well, it’s all fun until Jimmy and Beth fall asleep on the beach after making out and the tide starts to roll in…

So, what we have here are all the elements of a classic “revenge and consequences for bullying and stupid, drunken behavior” tale established in such films as TERROR TRAIN (1980), I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER (1997) and VALENTINE (2001), with a bit of torture porn influence thrown in to spice it up. This is not a criticism. As stated earlier, every story has been told before, but does writer and director Robert Mearns do anything to make his take on the material stand out? Again, it depends on the context in which you view it.

PRANK is a short film that was made based on a feature script that Mearns’ currently has in development. If viewed as an extended trailer to generate interest in the larger project, it works very well. The cinematography by DP Paolo Cascio, especially in the kill room scenes, is extremely accomplished and striking, the editing and sound design are very effective in creating a sense of tension, and the viewer gets just enough of the story to whet the appetite and leave them wanting more. Based on this, I can understand why the movie received a nomination for Best Short Under Ten Minutes at Shriekfest 2012. As the credits rolled, I found myself wanting to see where Mearns is going with this.

And this wanting is precisely why PRANK does not hold up as a stand-alone short. We are given the foundation of a story, but no story arc. We see that Jimmy is a bullying douchebag who does stupid things and Beth is his girlfriend with a heart of gold who knows what they are doing is wrong but is too passive and enamoured of her boyfriend to do anything, but we get no character development. And at the climax, we don’t even get a payoff. The movie does not end so much as just stops.

So the final judgment on PRANK is that Mearns and company show a lot of potential. I look forward to seeing the feature in order to see how he brings his own, fresh voice to an old story.

You can check out the trailer here.

© Copyright 2012 by Gregory G. Kurczynski

Screams Cut Short: THE SLEEPOVER (2012)

Posted in 2012, Gregory G. Kurczynski Columns, Screams Cut Short, Short Films, Slasher Movies with tags , , , , , on October 24, 2012 by knifefighter

SCREAMS CUT SHORT:
THE SLEEPOVER (2012)
By Gregory G. Kurczynski

I love this time of year. The oppressive heat, humidity and hurricanes of summer give way to the crispness of fall and we begin to turn our attention to the greatest holiday on the calendar, Halloween. More importantly, the weeks leading up to October 31st bring us into the thick of the horror film festival scene and a bumper crop of new independent films to discover. With this in mind, it is only fitting that SCREAMS CUT SHORT takes some time for the next few columns to focus on some of these new efforts, starting with director Chris Cullari’s homage to the slasher genre, THE SLEEPOVER (2012).

The story begins innocently enough with two boys, Tom (Josh Feldman) and his new friend Eric (Gus Kamp), being checked on for a final goodnight by their babysitter, Rachel (Carolyn Jania), as they prepare for bed. Tom actually goes to bed, much to the chagrin of Eric whose idea of a sleepover involves less sleep and more firecrackers and surfing the web for pictures of naked girls. Eric continues to instigate, but Tom will have none of it, simply saying that it’s “not safe.”

Being the new kid in town, Eric is not aware that the town of Derry has been plagued for years by a masked serial killer known as “The Slasher.” This personification of evil can appear at any time and without warning, leading the good people of Derry to take such precautions as checking the closets and under the bed before lights out and requiring babysitters to be licensed and trained in hand-to-hand combat. Of course Eric isn’t buying a word of it, arguing angrily that “The Slasher” is nothing more than an invention of parents devised to scare kids into behaving and going to bed on time.

Who’s right? Is “The Slasher” real? If you’ve seen any number of horror films produced from 1977 onward, those questions aren’t hard to answer. But in its approximately six minute run time, THE SLEEPOVER certainly has a lot of fun doing so.

Tom (Josh Feldman) and Eric (Gus Kamp) get ready for bed in THE SLEEPOVER.

One thing that is clear after seeing this movie is that Cullari has an intimate understanding and knowledge of the slasher film, and he’s not afraid to use every cliché in his arsenal to throw at the audience. From ominous music cues climaxing in shocking stingers to camera setups designed to foreshadow what may or may not be lurking in the shadows, it’s all here. But Cullari turns these elements on their head in such a way that the final product seems fresh. He invites the audience to join him in poking respectful fun of the genre, but it’s never mean-spirited or self-referential. For fans of the genre, this movie is a reminder of why some of the greatest masked killer movies are so much fun.

But the most impressive element of THE SLEEPOVER is in the performances of Feldman and Kamp, the two young leads. These boys play against each other in a completely relaxed and funny manner that makes the viewer really believe the friendship. I’m sure that this is due in no small part from the dialogue written by Cullari and co-writer Jennifer Raite, but the actors make it real.

THE SLEEPOVER took the award for best super short film at this year’s Shriekfest Horror Film Festival,as well as being named Runner Up in the “Short Fuse” category at Fantastic Fest. These awards were richly deserved, and as it continues to make the festival rounds, I would highly recommend catching this one.

For additional information and news on upcoming screenings, you can visit the movie’s Facebook page here. Also, check out the trailer here.

-END-

© Copyright 2012 by Gregory G. Kurczynski

This week’s spotlight is on:
THE SLEEPOVER (2012)
Directed by Chris Cullari
Written by Chris Cullari and Jennifer Raite